Frequencies For Your Favorite NASCAR Drivers

12 02 2008

Auto Racing has become the fastest growing spectator sport in the United States.  NASCAR fans enjoy the ability to hear thier favorite drivers and crew directly via hand held scanners.  The frequency range is between 450-460 Mhz. A few drivers have recently changed to 800-900mhz frequencies

Nascanner descided to provide frequency updates on NowPublic free.   Here are our first update.  Dale Jr. is nw in the 88 Car

84 AJ Almindinger 452.0875 456.5625
88 Dale Earnhardt Jr 468.5250 466.3750

Other Driver frequencies at http://www.nascanner.com/sprint.html

NASCANNER: 2008 Auto Racing Frequencies, Schedule, and Driver Guide

Here is a NASCAR scanner frequency Primer from two sources.

 Using a Scanner at a NASCAR Race

Once you’ve experienced a race with a scanner, you can’t imagine watching one without the headphones on your ears.  You are able to listen to communication among the driver, his pit crew and spotter, as well as radio broadcasts and track announcements, which are usually otherwise inaudible due to the race noise.

Using a scanner helps you discover the race behind the race, hearing differing pit strategies, learning how the cars are handling and discovering who is mad at whom.  Basically, you’ll hear what these guys really want to say, but can’t in front of a television camera.

When I started scanning races, I used a cheap 200-channel scanner with a frequency range reaching 800Mhz, and two sets of inexpensive headphones with a splitter.  I bought it on sale in 1997, and the whole set-up cost me around $200. It worked, but I have since learned that there are big differences with scanners, headsets and even antennaes. In short, you can get by with less expensive set-ups, but spending a few extra dollars will save some frustration with bleed-over and lost reception at the track.

If you don’t want to buy a scanner, you can rent them at the track. The cost to rent one for the weekend is $55-60, so you can do the math to see how quickly you can own one at those prices. Plus, I’ve seen the trackside rental places run out of scanners, so you’re definitely not guaranteed to get one.

Using a Scanner at a NASCAR Race

Once you’ve experienced a race with a scanner, you can’t imagine watching one without the headphones on your ears.  You are able to listen to communication among the driver, his pit crew and spotter, as well as radio broadcasts and track announcements, which are usually otherwise inaudible due to the race noise.

Using a scanner helps you discover the race behind the race, hearing differing pit strategies, learning how the cars are handling and discovering who is mad at whom.  Basically, you’ll hear what these guys really want to say, but can’t in front of a television camera.

When I started scanning races, I used a cheap 200-channel scanner with a frequency range reaching 800Mhz, and two sets of inexpensive headphones with a splitter.  I bought it on sale in 1997, and the whole set-up cost me around $200. It worked, but I have since learned that there are big differences with scanners, headsets and even antennaes. In short, you can get by with less expensive set-ups, but spending a few extra dollars will save some frustration with bleed-over and lost reception at the track.

If you don’t want to buy a scanner, you can rent them at the track. The cost to rent one for the weekend is $55-60, so you can do the math to see how quickly you can own one at those prices. Plus, I’ve seen the trackside rental places run out of scanners, so you’re definitely not guaranteed to get one.

Nascar scanner frequency information from Fact Expert

What would it be like to be a part of the thrill and excitement that goes on among the crew of NASCAR driver during a heated race? Those that know the NASCAR frequencies that each individual driver transmits on during the race can say that they’ve experienced it all first hand. Drivers run into all kinds of problems during races and they have a lot of triumphs too. It’s all usually captured through the transmissions they send to their crew as they tear around the track and for those in the know, they can be a part of it all as well. However it should be said that the activity of scanning frequencies can be considered illegal in some cases so it’s important to know what’s going to get you in very big trouble and what areas considered ok to an extent.

First of all, not all frequencies are the same from race to race and track to track. There are groups that keep up with NASCAR frequencies and if you’re planning on making it a part of your regular trips to the races, you may want to join one. That’s not to say that there aren’t places online that you can find these out, but it’s nice to belong to a community of fellow enthusiasts that may be willing to share a lot of information and tips that you can’t always find anywhere else. If frequencies have been changed for any reason, you may find out from a friend in a group or forum before you head out to the track.

NASCAR Frequencies Can Change From Race To Race

Each of the drivers in a race has several NASCAR frequencies to broadcast on. Even the governing body of NASCAR itself can’t determine which frequencies will be useable at all times. There are usually about four available frequencies for a driver. A primary and secondary as well as two alternates. Thankfully there are some websites that list all of these for scanner enthusiasts to make use of. But it’s not just for a single area of NASCAR. In some cases, the frequencies for all of the series including the Busch, Nextel and even CART racing.

Frequencies For Your Favorite NASCAR Drivers

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