Nascanner Auto Racing Frequency Pit Stop Blog has Moved to our main site at Nascanner.com

18 06 2011

Hello all, This blog has moved to our main site http://www.nascanner.com/  until this week NASCANNER was a frontpage site with no ability for a blog.  We have updated NASCANNER so the NASCAR frequencies site and the blog are now one site.  For NASCANNER drivers frequencies and news please go to our main site at NASCANNER





Danica Partrick Catty after Crash at Bristol

20 03 2011
BRISTOL, TN - MARCH 18:  Danica Patrick, drive...

Image by Getty Images via @daylife

Danica Patrick’s spring session in NASCAR ended with a bang. A big one. And she wasn’t happy about it.

With 53 laps to go in Saturday’s Nationwide race at Bristol Motor Speedway, Patrick made contact with Ryan Truex. Patrick’s car spun hard into the wall – first the nose, then the rear, leaving her with a destroyed race car.

After getting out of her car, Patrick waited for the cars to come back around. When they did, Patrick walked onto the track, located Truex and spread her arms apart as if to say, “What gives?”

“It felt like to me – I came out of the corner I was just running down the straight and it felt like he came off the wall,” said Patrick, who was running 17th at the time, two laps down. “I don’t I know if he had a tag-slap off the wall, like he was pushing up and then it snapped on him and he came off. I don’t know. I don’t know if I may be giving him the benefit of the doubt right there.”

Upon first look it didn’t appear as though Truex did anything wrong. It looked liked Patrick got loose, slipped up the track and into Truex’s rear bumper. But the head-on replay does show Truex turning slightly into Patrick’s lane.

“It was my fault. I guess that’s just racing at Bristol,” Truex said. “We were racing there and I just came off the corner, got loose, and as I was saving it just came down the hill and got into her. My fault. I mean, I’m sorry. I didn’t want for that to happen. I don’t know if she thinks I did it on purpose. I guess she’s just mad because she was running good. It was an accident. I apologize.”

Regardless of fault, it was a tough way for Patrick to end this portion of her Nationwide schedule. She’d finished in the top 20 in her first three races, including a career-best fourth-place run two weeks ago at Las Vegas.

She ended up 33rd at Bristol.

Read more at  NASCAR – Yahoo! Sports.

See also NASCANNER NASCAR Driver Frequencies

Enhanced by Zemanta




2011 Daytona 500 Race Results: 20 Year Old Rookie Trevor Bayne wins the Daytona 500

20 02 2011

20 Year Old Rookie Trevor Bayne has won the Daytona 500

Improbably, unbelievably, 20-year-old Trevor Bayne has won the Daytona 500.

A kid who just left his teen years on Saturday won the Great American Race a day later, ushering in NASCAR’s newest star. Amazingly, Bayne has no full-time ride and isn’t even running for points in the Sprint Cup Series this year.

Somehow, Bayne sent the Wood Brothers’ famous No. 21 car to Victory Lane, with a retro David Pearson paint scheme along for the ride.

Runnerup Carl Edwards’ late charge – a push from third-place David Gilliland – was barely not enough to overtake Bayne.

There was a race record for both lead changes and caution flags resulted in one of the strangest Daytona 500s in the 53-year history of the “Great American Race.”

The two-car drafts were prevalent throughout the race – as expected – and there were plenty of crashes because of it. Several star drivers were collected in early wrecks, leaving just a few solid contenders at the end.

Get the  full race results for the 2011 Daytona 500 SBNation.com.

Related:

Free NASCAR Driver Frequencies – Nascanner

Trevor Bayne 452.2000 Mhz
461.7250 Mhz




Dale Earnhardt Jr. Remembers His Father, Fans have moment of Silence

20 02 2011

DAYTONA BEACH, Fla. — The white No. 3 decals are no bigger than a fist and sit just above and behind the driver’s side window of all the Richard Childress Racing team’s Chevrolets. Crew members wore black baseball caps with the same No. 3 logo and driver Tony Stewart strolled through the Daytona International Speedway garage Friday afternoon clutching one of the prized caps himself.

Friday marked exactly 10 years since the driver of the Richard Childress Racing No. 3, seven-time NASCAR champion Dale Earnhardt, was killed in Turn 4 of this track after crashing on the last lap of the Daytona 500. The speedway will remember the NASCAR icon with a moment of silence and fans will hold up three fingers on the third lap of Sunday’s Daytona 500.

But for such an overwhelming event, it has been a subdued, subtle and suiting anniversary.

For the past week, Earnhardt’s competitors, teammates and friends have shared emotional stories about that fateful Sunday afternoon. But the one person you won’t see participate in any contrived memorial this weekend is Earnhardt’s son, Dale Jr. No hat, no decal. None necessary.

“I’d personally rather just watch it and stand on the sidelines,” Earnhardt said of the various tributes and memorials planned for the weekend.

“It’s more fun for me hearing how other people reflect, hearing other people’s stories. I know how I feel in my heart and I don’t feel a real need to discuss that a lot.

“I want to do what’s right and honor him, but I don’t need to do it in front of a bunch of people. I feel like he carries his own weight and he doesn’t need me being a part of the celebration or whatever you want to call it. I don’t want to take away from it in any way.”

Read the Rest at Dale Earnhardt Jr. Remembers His Father in His Own Way — Motorsports FanHouse.

Related:

Dale Earnhardt Jr. NASCAR Frequencies





NASCAR: Drivers Get The Wins; Fans Get The Points

4 02 2011

During his annual State of the Union address on Jan. 25, President Barack Obama did something nearly unprecedented in politics – he had Republicans and Democrats actually sit together in one big, co-mingled group. Generally, the two opposing parties are separated from one another like family members at Thanksgiving dinner, although it can sometimes be challenging to tell which table belongs to the grownups and which to the kids.

Just one day later, in his ‘State of the Sport’ address on Jan. 26, NASCAR Chairman and CEO Brian France did much the same thing, informing the assembled press corps and a live TV audience that the 2011 season would serve to better blend the sport’s top two performance aspects.

Consistency has always been critical to success in NASCAR, which has the longest season in professional sports. It’s not exactly what you might call breaking news, but during his remarks, France pinpointed another characteristic particularly important to fans – “They care about winning. They don’t want drivers to just be content with a good points day or a good run,” he said.

Since the inception of the Chase for the NASCAR Sprint Cup format in 2004,‘racing for points’ during the first 26 races of the season simply meant a driver worked his way into the Top 12, then did whatever was necessary to ensure he stayed there. If this meant ‘laying up’ and settling for a Top 5 or Top 10 finish instead of going whole-hog for the win, he did it, in order to have an opportunity to race for the title at the end of the year.

I don’t remember this being much of an issue in the early years of the Chase, but things did flare up a bit in 2009 when Juan Pablo Montoya publicly stated that he had been points racing all season, with the single purpose of making the Chase. A lot of fans didn’t really grasp the charm of that comment.

Another thing fans haven’t altogether grasped over the years is NASCAR’s somewhat complicated scoring system. During a Jan. 21 press conference at Daytona International Speedway, Kevin Harvick remarked that at the end of the 2010 season, he had gotten a text message from New York Yankees manager Joe Girardi, congratulating him on a good season but noting,” I don’t understand how you have the best year and not win. I don’t understand your points system.”

Now, I’m the type who, when required to figure out a restaurant tip or double a recipe, still occasionally suffers from a sort of post-testing stress disorder, flashing back to the math portion of the SAT. And granted, baseball’s scoring system is pretty easy to understand – you get a W when you win and an L when you lose and that pretty much sums it up.

But I get Girardi’s point. We shouldn’t have to work quite as hard as Abbott and Costello to figure out who’s on first.

via Drivers Get The Wins; Fans Get The Points | SPRINT CUP SERIES | Auto Racing News.

Related:

2011 NASCAR Sprint Cup and other  Auto Racing Frequencies

Follow NASCANNER on Twitter

via NASCAR: Drivers Get The Wins; Fans Get The Points | Nascanner.





Earnhardt Jr. drives the No. 3 to Victory Lane at Daytona

3 07 2010

DAYTONA BEACH, Fla. — Driving the No. 3 Wrangler Chevrolet in honor of his late father, Dale Earnhardt Jr. broke a Nationwide Series drought of almost four years in winning Friday’s Subway Jalapeno 250 Nationwide Series race at Daytona International Speedway.

Earnhardt’s emotional win was the result of a collaboration between owner Richard Childress, Teresa Earnhardt, JR Motorsports and Hendrick Motorsports, which supplied the engine for the No. 3 car.

The victory, the 23rd of Earnhardt’s career, was his first in the series since Aug. 19, 2006, when he took the checkered flag at Michigan. It was his first points win in any of NASCAR’s top three series since June 15, 2008, when Earnhardt captured the Lifelock 400 Sprint Cup race, again at Michigan.

In a race that saw the debut of NASCAR’s new Nationwide car, Earnhardt held off runner-up Joey Logano and third-place finisher Ricky Stenhouse Jr. in a green-white-checkered-flag finish that took the race two laps beyond its scheduled distance of 100 laps.

“I was so worried that I wasn’t going to win, ’cause nothing but a win would get it-for everybody,” Earnhardt said after getting hugs from Childress, crew chief Tony Eury Jr. and a multitude of others in victory lane. “If we didn’t win, what a waste of time. …

“I worked hard to try to win, not only for daddy-I’m proud of him going to the Hall of Fame, and he would be proud of this, I’m sure — but just all these fans. I hope they enjoyed this. This is it — no more ‘3’ for me. That’s it.”

With a push from Justin Allgaier, Earnhardt took the lead for the first time on Lap 70, surging past Kyle Busch through Turns 1 and 2. On that same lap, NASCAR called a caution for debris on the backstretch. Pitting under the caution, Earnhardt retained his lead, thanks to a quick, problem-free stop by Earnhardt’s No. 88 Cup crew, which volunteered for the race.

Read the Full story at  NASCAR Nationwide Series.

Related:

North American Racing Scanner Frequencies